Publications

2017
Roehr-Brackin, K., & Tellier, A. (2017). How to improve children’s language awareness at primary school. The Conversation. Website
Tellier A. & Roehr-Brackin, K. (2017). Raising children’s metalinguistic awareness to enhance classroom second language learning. In García Mayo, M. del P (Ed.), Learning Foreign Languages in Primary School: Research Insights. pp. 22-48. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
2013
Tellier, A. (2013). Developing a measure of metalinguistic awareness for children aged 8–11. In Roehr K. & Gánem-Gutiérrez G. A. (Eds.) The metalinguistic dimension in instructed second language learning, pp. 15-43. London: Bloomsbury.
Tellier, A., & Roehr-Brackin, K. (2013). The development of language learning aptitude and metalinguistic awareness in primary-school children: A classroom study. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics, 62. WebsiteAbstract
In the typical foreign language classroom, many learners all over the world find themselves in a minimal-input environment. Existing research suggests that in such a setting, adolescents typically outperform younger children. The greater cognitive maturity of older learners manifests itself in greater language learning aptitude, greater metalinguistic awareness, and enhanced capacity for explicit learning. We examined whether the teaching and learning of either Esperanto or French would facilitate the development of language learning aptitude and metalinguistic awareness in 8-9-year-old children (N=28), thus setting the scene for enhanced explicit learning even at a young age. Following instruction in either Esperanto or French over a school year, children made significant gains on measures of aptitude, metalinguistic awareness, and L2 proficiency. Effect sizes in the Esperanto group were larger throughout, however, with greater homogeneity of performance in evidence and a closer association between aptitude, metalinguistic awareness, and L2 proficiency at the end of the treatment. Moreover, Esperanto proved significantly easier to learn than French, with larger gains in L2 proficiency achieved by the Esperanto group compared with the French group. Finally, we found that language-analytic ability emerged as a significant predictor of L2 achievement in the sample as a whole.
Esperanto as a starter language for child second-language learners in the primary school. 2nd edition
Tellier, A. (2013). Esperanto as a starter language for child second-language learners in the primary school. 2nd edition. Barlaston: Esperanto UK.Abstract
This publication (edited by Angela Tellier) presents the theory and research behind the claim that a starter language such as Esperanto may have a positive and lasting effect on language learning. Esperanto is a regular and easily accessible language, which encourages children to analyse words and manipulate them creatively. It makes the functions of words in sentences clear, and invites comparisons with the languages from which its international roots are drawn. Essentially, it is a deluxe construction kit for language learning. Chapters include summaries of findings from the five-year Springboard to Languages case study and the Springboard to Languages Comenius project.
Esperanto as a starter language.pdf 'Springboard to Languages' Poster.pdf
Tellier, A., & Roehr-Brackin, K. (2013). Metalinguistic awareness in children with differing language learning experience. In Roberts, Leah, Anna Ewert, Miroslaw Pawlak and Magdalena Wrembel (eds.). EuroSLA Yearbook, 13 pp. 81–108.
2012
Tellier, A. (2012). Esperanto as a potential aid to language learning in primary schools. In A. Tellier (Ed.), Esperanto as a starter language for child second-language learners in the primary school. Barlaston: Esperanto UK, pp. 23-34.
Tellier, A. (2012). Esperanto as a starter language for child second-language learners in the primary school. Barlaston: Esperanto UK.Abstract
This publication (edited by Angela Tellier) presents the theory and research behind the claim that a starter language such as Esperanto may have a positive and lasting effect on language learning. Esperanto is a regular and easily accessible language, which encourages children to analyse words and manipulate them creatively. It makes the functions of words in sentences clear, and invites comparisons with the languages from which its international roots are drawn. Essentially, it is a deluxe construction kit for language learning. Chapters include summaries of findings from the five-year Springboard to Languages case study and the Springboard to Languages Comenius project.
Review: Greatrex, G. (2013) in Language Problems & Language Planning, 37.1: 97-99.